Scaling Network Security Technologies by Decoupling Traffic Ingestion from Analysis using Open-Source

Thanks to my good friend Marc Uchniat for helping develop this idea As networks grow larger and faster, monitoring technologies have a difficult time scaling. Most times, solutions involve splitting traffic into smaller and smaller feeds from network tap infrastructure, and running analysis tools at line-rate on that traffic. If the traffic volume exceeds the … Continue reading “Scaling Network Security Technologies by Decoupling Traffic Ingestion from Analysis using Open-Source”

Getting into the Pace 5268AC Router, part 3: Sacrifices Must be Made (to the JTAG gods)

After several unsuccessful attempts to figure out how the password for the PKCS12 archives is generated, I decided to build a jig to interface with the diagnostic port on the front to see if I could find a JTAG interface.  Unfortunately, the connector used had a 1mm pin pitch that was difficult to find an … Continue reading “Getting into the Pace 5268AC Router, part 3: Sacrifices Must be Made (to the JTAG gods)”

Let’s Repair an Ancient Macintosh SE/30, part 2: What the Hell is a Simasimac?

After the previous post, the first order of business was to get the capacitors and battery replaced. I used tantalum capacitors instead of electrolytics to prevent the same thing from happening again down the road. This presented some challenges, as some of the larger electrolytics had very different footprints from their tantalum counterparts. I simply … Continue reading “Let’s Repair an Ancient Macintosh SE/30, part 2: What the Hell is a Simasimac?”

AF_PACKET bindings for Rust

I’ve finally gotten my AF_PACKET bindings in Rust working properly – this should allow people to start developing network sniffers, monitoring tools, and security-related software using Rust.  There’s a lot of clean-up ahead and I want to make the interface more controllable, but for now, it’s still pretty simple to use.  I need to write … Continue reading “AF_PACKET bindings for Rust”

Let’s Repair an Ancient Macintosh SE/30, part 1: Looks Like it’s Broken

This weekend I attended the 7th Vintage Computer Festival Southeast in Roswell, GA. Before going, I promised myself that I wouldn’t buy anything, but they happened to have an as-is Macintosh SE/30 for sale for $60, and I happened to have been looking at them all week, so I took a chance and bought it. … Continue reading “Let’s Repair an Ancient Macintosh SE/30, part 1: Looks Like it’s Broken”

Getting into the Pace 5268AC Router, part 2: Dumping the Flash Chip, Finding Keys

My attempt to crack the md5crypt hash found in /etc/shadow on the device had failed (due to someone unplugging the machine I was using in the middle of the job), and after poking around at test pads around the SOC and finding nothing immediately useful, I decided the next step would be to dump the … Continue reading “Getting into the Pace 5268AC Router, part 2: Dumping the Flash Chip, Finding Keys”

Getting into the Pace 5268AC Router, part 1: Terminals and Hashes

I got stuck on my Casio SK-1 project and needed to take a break, so I started on another project I’ve been meaning to do. I’ve had gigabit fiber service at my apartment in Atlanta for nearly two years through a major global telecom provider. The service itself has been pretty good, but one thing … Continue reading “Getting into the Pace 5268AC Router, part 1: Terminals and Hashes”

Reverse-Engineering the Casio SK-1, part 2: The ROM is now an Arduino

After some trial and error, I settled on adding some right-angle connectors to the board where the ROM lived. I staggered them so that the connectors would fit properly. I used the same pins on both sides that I’d used to dump the ROM, however, now the inputs and outputs are switched because we’re getting … Continue reading “Reverse-Engineering the Casio SK-1, part 2: The ROM is now an Arduino”

Reverse-Engineering the Casio SK-1, part 1: Dumping the ROM

When I was younger, I had a Casio SK-1 keyboard that I had a ton of fun with.  Of course, I found out about “Circuit Bending,” and in short order, my keyboard was no longer functional. The Casio SK-1 is famously modifiable, its simple electronics making all manner of sounds when fed unexpected data across … Continue reading “Reverse-Engineering the Casio SK-1, part 1: Dumping the ROM”